Posts Tagged ‘designer of the year’

Each year “Designer of the Year” is awarded to the designer who accumulates the most points during the calender year.  (1st – 1000pts, 2nd – 800pts, 3rd – 600pts, 4th – 400pts, 5th – 300pts, 6th – 200pts, 7th – 100pts, 8th – 50pts) This year was a competitive year with over 40 different designers earning points for their work.

The Top 10 Designers of 2013:

  1. Trev                                5000 pts
  2. 3Design                         3400 pts
  3. Moffatt                          3000 pts
  4. Shevitz                          2400 pts
  5. TokyoBoomBox         2000 pts
  6. Quetzal                          1800 pts
  7. Jayhung                        1800 pts
  8. BoilerDowd                 1400 pts
  9. JustinCumming         1400 pts
  10. LiunchMeat                 1400 pts
  11. Evrich                            1400 pts

Read more about MESH01 2013 Designer of the Year: Trev

2013 Designer of the Year

We are proud to announce that the 2013 MESH01 Designer of the Year is none other than Trev. In 2013 3Design led the pack finishing 1st in 2 different projects, 2nd on 3 occasions, and 3rd once.  I had the chance to catch up with him again to learn more about his background in design.

How did you learn about MESH01?

Rebooting my footwear design career in 2011 after a hiatus, I randomly discovered Mesh01 as I was doing various footwear searches but did not enter. A year later, a footwear design recruiter found my new portfolio on Coroflot and suggested that I enter some Mesh01 competitions to help revitalize my skills.

Had you participated in a design competition before?

Not in footwear, but for portrait drawing.

 Can you tell us about your path towards becoming an Industrial designer?

I was born with it, always drawing and designing spaceships, jets, medieval fantasy characters, bmx bikes, game consoles and even whole computer systems. As teenagers in a spacious rural village with access to construction materials and tools, we built everything from go-carts to bow and arrows to mini camps, complete with a working wood stove, insulated walls, water-tight roofs, sleeping bunks and even lights powered by a (cough) stolen car battery. For a high school wood-working project, I designed and built my own drawing/ computer desk.

It wasn’t until I discovered shoes at about age thirteen that began to dream about being a designer. I had no clue how to do that, so I created some concepts and mailed them off to Nike, my hero brand at the time. They personally replied, telling me that most of their designers have Industrial Design degrees. So I went to school for ID and got a job as a Junior Designer job with the Power brand in Toronto, Ontario.

Three years later I was on my own freelancing for the same brand, but I got creatively frustrated with the medium market limitations; shoe design went from a passion to grueling work. I had the creative fire of a volcano but didn’t yet learn how to channel it like a flame thrower to properly serve the brand and market, so I went dormant instead.

Moving on from the shoe industry altogether and bouncing around regular jobs to pay the bills but brought little satisfaction, I started experimenting with art, portraits and the like, but these turned out to be only hobby-level passions.

Later, I was blessed with a government office job that I surprisingly enjoyed for over 3 years, but that joy was unexpectedly overshadowed during a mundane corporate meeting concerning such well-known issues as dress codes and bathroom etiquette: to pass the long hours ahead, I starting sketching shoes which I hadn’t done for several years. Like a blast of warm air on cold, grey coals, the forgotten fire was suddenly rekindled. Realizing that I was missing my call, I began the process of rebooting my career a year later.

Through Mesh01, I’ve been able to take the next step of reintegration by being able to design footwear for several brands and categories, getting some fresh experience and credibility.

 What are some of the highlights of your career to date?

That’s a tough one. I’ve had a lot of good experiences in footwear design and appreciate the unexpected success so far, but I don’t think I’ve hit any highlights yet since I feel there’s so much more that’s unexplored.

 What do you feel makes your designs and style different/unique from others?

Though I appreciate and respect the creative diversity in footwear, most of the shoes on the market don’t appeal to me so it’s natural for me want to do something different. Understanding and being part of the market is important to a point – there has to be an arcing emotional and technical relevance to attract the consumer, but I resist following the micro-trends simply if it’s what we’re “supposed” to do and everybody expects it. If it’s fresh, inspiring and technically sound than sure I may jump on board, but I have to step out somewhere and do my own thing to keep the creative juices flowing.

My motto is “push it” so my designs can be polarizing because of the excess either of stylistic expression and/ or detailing, especially in this minimalist age.

Who are some of the designers / artists that you pull your inspiration from?

For some unexplained reason, I’ve never been a follower of particular designers, though I certainly acknowledge and respect the Earl Tupper’s and Tinker Hatfield’s of the industry. Ironically, when I stepped away from shoes and got a little into art, drawing portraits and photography, it was these artists who later influenced my thinking about footwear design:

- JMW Turner for his ability to mix the realism of precision drawings with fantastical color pallets and expressionism – like shoe design.

- John Singer Sargent for his minimalist approach: In some paintings it’s as if he’s wielding the brush like a two-edged sword as he slashes the canvas to and fro, yet he still captures the soft, subtle sensibilities of his subjects.

- Claude Monet and other impressionists because they are artistically the opposite of what I am – a realist. I tend to over-design and be very logical and literal, even with integrated graphic details. Good design is quite often beautifully simple and I strive for that.

- Ansel Adams’ black and white view of the world. He helped me to appreciate not the color of design, but what design is in the absence of it.

It was art/ photography that taught me about the importance of composition, texture, color, balance, tone and subject matter, which I later translated to footwear. Before that I just wanted to do “cool” shoes. Designing shoes now, sometimes I even like to try and lead the viewer’s eye around the shoe, like a painting.

Trev, Thank you for your time, can you offer any words of advice to the other designers out there in the MESH01 community?

1. Do what you love and love what you do. Money and the material possessions of life will never replace the satisfaction of doing what you’re made to do.

2. You never know what abilities and talents you have until you try. If you’re afraid to step out, do it afraid.

“A man can find no greater satisfaction than in his work”

- Solomon, Ecclesiastes 2:24

Be sure to check out Trev’s portfolio here:

www.coroflot.com/trevorford#keyword=trevor%20ford

 

MESH01 2012 Designer of the Year: 3Design

We are proud to announce that the 2012 MESH01 Designer of the Year is none other than 3Design. In 2012 3Design led the pack finishing 1st in 5 different projects, 2nd on 3 occasions, and 3rd once.  You may have read our blog featuring his designs back in November, but I had the chance to catch up with him again to learn more about his background in design.

How did you learn about MESH01?
Visiting design sites, one day I saw the publication named the MESH01, I entered the link, and saw that it was a site dedicated to product design competitions, so I started to participate in it.

Had you participated in any design competitions before?
Yes, but nothing compared to MESH01 competition or on-line. Here in Brazil, there is a contest to highlight designers to market “TOP OF STYLE”.  This happens only once a year, like those contests taking place in Italy and other countries such as Thailand and Japan.

Can you tell us about your path towards becoming an Industrial designer?
Well, nothing too complicated. I come from a family of traditional modelers, and was always surrounded by information on product development and marketing, so I began to put my ideas into practice, with the help of graphical computing. First with marketing and advertising, then I majored in technical footwear and later industrial design, always looking for the 3D digital world, rapid prototyping, robotics and modeling speed. After a while there began to appear opportunities to create products for businesses in the city where I live, and later to companies from other cities in Brazil.

What are some of the highlights of your career to date?
Nothing too great, but with a sense of gratification, having the opportunity to create many products that have been very well accepted in the Brazilian market and for export.

What do you feel makes your designs and style different/unique from others?
I feel totally the will to create all projects in 3D/DIGITAL modeling, from start to finish, but with a small contribution from 2D sketches, something like / 3D 85% – 15% 2D.

Who are some of the designers / artists that you pull your inspiration from?
I’m always looking for a way to create a form and a style unique and unparalleled, but when lacking inspiration, I always have on hand architecture books, technology, automotive and decorative, and 3D movies.

Where can designers go to see more of your work?
Here on MESH01, but also COROFLOT and FACEBOOK

Thank you for the interview, can you offer any words of advice to the other designers out there in the MESH01 community? “Feed the DNA of creativity, always,” and always alert because ideas and opportunities should not be discarded.

You can see MESH01′s Top 10 Designers of 2012 Here

MESH01 2011 Designer of the Year: Renderman

We are proud to announce that Mark Kokavec AKA Renderman is the 2011 MESH01 Designer of the Year. I had the chance to talk with Mark to learn a little more about him and his background in design, he even tells us where you can learn his and other leading designer’s techniques.

  How did you learn about MESH01?

I was doing some “design” research online.

Had you participated in a design competition before?

I had never participated in an online competition but I had hosted a couple on my old website a few years back.  They were focused on footwear design and the winner was featured in SLAM magazine.

Can you tell us about your path towards becoming an Industrial designer?

Growing up, I was always an artist and realized I wanted to do something related to design while in High School.  It wasn’t until my best friend introduced me to the College For Creative Studies (CCS), where I decided to make “Design” a career.  I started studying Automotive Design at CCS and later transitioned into Product Design.  I never interned for a large company (but wish I had).  I landed my first job with Reebok 3 months prior to graduating.  Yes, I finished my degree before starting the new job!

After 6 years heading up the Tennis category, I moved to Converse to manage and lead their Basketball division.  Then it was off to Under Armour where I worked on Football, Baseball, Lacrosse, Soccer, Training, Slides, Kids and Basketball footwear.  My main responsibility was as Sr. Design Manager for Running and Trail.

What are some of the highlights of your career to date?

The exciting part of being a footwear designer is the opportunity to work closely with professional athletes.  I’ve have the opportunity to work closely with athletes at the top of their game such as… Venus Williams (Tennis), Chris McCormack (Iron Man) and Dwyane Wade (Basketball).  Seeing my designs on their feet during Grand Slams and Playoffs is a hard feeling to describe.  It’s very special.  Being part of that history, albeit in a small way, is extremely fulfilling.

What do you feel makes your designs and style different/unique from others?

The main difference is the integration of the digital medium into my process.  The way I use multiple software packages in harmony to achieve a final design is my “special recipe”.  I’m always looking for new processes to add into my workflow.  If there is a program that can help improve the final design, I try to figure out which parts to use and add them in.

Who are some of the designers / artists that you pull your inspiration from?

When I feel the need to get inspired, I typically turn to the entertainment industry.  I find the images and concepts to be full of creative energy and always come away with a refreshed and energized mind.  Daniel Simon’s “Cosmic Motors” picture book is always nearby.

In addition to designing you have also founded a company called Render Demo.  Can you tell us a little about what Render Demo does?

Render Demo started out as a hobby in 2008.  I wanted to share the skills and techniques that took me years to develop, with other designers.  I was fortunate to receive an education at CCS and realized that there are so many young artists and designers out there that (for whatever reason) wouldn’t be able to access this type of training.  So that’s when I decided to start Render Demo.

Render Demo consists of industry leading designers sharing their real-world techniques and processes through detailed video tutorials.  We currently focus on digital techniques but will be expanding our library to include traditional techniques like pen and paper, in the near future.

Our mission and goal is to provide artists and designers that are looking to improve on their current technique or interested in exploring new techniques, the means to do so.  From beginner to advanced level training, there is something for everyone.

For design training tutorials: http://www.renderdemo.com

I have personally seen one of Renderman’s live demos and would recommend it to any designer looking to expand on their techniques.

Where can our designers go to see more of your work?

For my portfolio and freelance design services: http://www.renderdemodesignstudio.com

Thank you for the interview, can you offer any words of advice to the other designers out there in the MESH01 community?

Never give up!  Keep pushing for your dream and do whatever it takes to live it.

One other thing… Always keep an open mind.  Taking criticism can be tough at times, but use it as a learning experience to grow and as a “fuel” to better yourself.